Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band c
in the washington area this morning. because at starbucks, in the washington, d.c., area at each of the starbucks locations, they write on the cups, "come together." it's sort of an impetus to maybe get these bozos in the house and the senate to come together in the fiscal cliff. we're going to be talking about the starbucks effort a little later in the show. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. >> good morning. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 27th. i'm mike barnicle in for joe, mika and willie. joining the table, we have political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. >> hi. >> applause for sam. "fortune's" assistant managing editor, leigh gallagher. and the president of the council on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is
-- >> can we do that in 2013? >> -- works. >> i know. is washington still capable of that? >> i predict that it will happen. i think you will have, just like we did then, you'll have people out here and out here that won't agree with that. but i think you'll have an operating majority to do something. i believe that will happen. >>> still ahead, we're joined by actor and director ben affleck and the emmy-winning star of "veep," julia louis-dreyfus. first, caroline kennedy with her new book on her father's presidency. we'll hear audio from jfk himself inside the oval office. irping ]hon [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping id
a dangerous game with investing in washington, in the congress. so my question to you is, if the united states congress, specifically the house of representatives, were a private industry, would you invest in it? would you buy it? >> i think i'd get new management. but i wouldn't give up on the country at all. it's a wonderful country. believe me, 535 people aren't going to screw it up forever for 512 million. >> but they can screw it up momentarily. >> they sure can. >> 1956, you write an article about this little-known -- >> one sentence. >> one sentence. >> it was in an article about another guy. >> this guy in omaha. at what point did the lightbulb go off over your head and said, okay, he's different, he's not only game changer, he's the guy that's going to create a new game? >> well, i may not have been that good, that expansive in my thinking, but i met him first in 1967. my husband had met him first and came homed and said, i think i may have met the smartest investor in the united states. and i think i probably rolled my eyes, because, you know, how husbands are always making these exa
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5